Synthesis and Antinociceptive Effect of Some Thiazole-Piperazine Derivatives: Involvement of Opioidergic System in the Activity


Creative Commons License

TURAN YÜCEL N., OSMANİYE D., Kandemir U., Evren A. E., CAN Ö. D., DEMİR ÖZKAY Ü.

MOLECULES, vol.26, no.11, 2021 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 26 Issue: 11
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.3390/molecules26113350
  • Journal Name: MOLECULES
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Aerospace Database, Biotechnology Research Abstracts, CAB Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Core, Communication Abstracts, EMBASE, Food Science & Technology Abstracts, MEDLINE, Metadex, Veterinary Science Database, Directory of Open Access Journals, Civil Engineering Abstracts
  • Keywords: thiazole, piperazine, tail-clip, hot-plate, acetic acid-induced writhing test, opioid, MODELS, PAIN, MECHANISMS, INHIBITOR, ANALGESIA, EXTRACT, ACID
  • Anadolu University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

In this study, we aimed to design and synthesize novel molecules carrying both the thiazole and piperazine rings in their structures and to investigate their antinociceptive activity. Targeted compounds were obtained by reacting thiosemicarbazide derivative and appropriate 2-bromoacetophenone in ethanol. The structures of the obtained compounds were determined using data from various spectroscopic methods (IR, H-1-NMR, C-13-NMR, and LCMSMS). Experimental data from in vivo tests showed that test compounds 3a-3c, 3f, and 3g (50 mg/kg) significantly prolonged reaction times of animals in tail-clip and hot-plate tests compared to the controls, indicating that these compounds possess centrally mediated antinociceptive activities. Furthermore, these compounds reduced the number of writhing behaviors in the acetic acid-induced writhing tests, showing that the compounds also possess peripheral antinociceptive activity. In the mechanistic studies, naloxone pre-treatments abolished the antinociceptive activities of compounds 3a-3c, 3f, and 3g, indicating that opioidergic mechanisms were involved in their antinociceptive effects. Molecular docking studies demonstrating significant interactions between the active compounds and mu- and delta-opioid receptor proteins supported the pharmacological findings. This study is the first showing that molecules designed to bear thiazole and piperazine moieties together on their structure exert centrally and peripherally mediated antinociceptive effects by activating the opioid system.