Employer and employee perceptions of cybervetting as a selection method


AKBULUT Y., Sen I. E. Y., ŞAHİN Y. L.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT, 2024 (SSCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/ijsa.12463
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, IBZ Online, ABI/INFORM, Business Source Elite, Business Source Premier, EBSCO Legal Collection, EBSCO Legal Source, Psycinfo
  • Anadolu University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Cybervetting-reviewing candidates' online profiles-is a relatively new technique used in the personnel selection processes, but empirical studies have largely been conducted with western samples. In Study 1, we interviewed 20 employers from different sectors in a metropolitan city in Turkey and examined the characteristics and implications of the construct. We summarized the reasons given by participants who avoided cybervetting (i.e., irrelevance, validity, invasion of privacy, prejudice) and those who frequently relied on cybervetting (i.e., necessity, validity, consistency checking) and illustrated perceived positive and negative online posts. In Study 2, we collected data from 316 employees in the same city to examine their perceptions of cybervetting and its relationship to organizational justice constructs. In addition to confirming international scales of cybervetting and organizational justice, we found that the face validity of cybervetting and organizational justice constructs were significantly correlated. While some differences were observed between employers and managers, no gender differences were found. The implications of both studies were presented in line with the available literature. The need to select the most appropriate employees for a vacant position is driving employers to new techniques, such as reviewing employees' online profiles. However, employers and employees may have different perceptions of such screening practices. By conducting two exploratory studies in an understudied setting, that is, Turkey, we reached not only leading employers in one of the country's major cities, but also their employees. We have identified the reasons for cybervetting, and the positive and negative characteristics of social media posts as perceived by employers. Societal characteristics of the current context and perceived government policies appear to change the nature of cybervetting patterns. That is, cultural fit was a perceived risk in addition to poor job fit. We also collected data from employees and validated two international scales. We found that perceptions changed when we looked at employees. That is, cybervetting is seen as inevitable by employers, but unfair by employees.